Philly Cheese Steak Smothered in Tomatoes

Philly Cheese Steak Smothered in Tomatoes

This lighter version of a classic favorite sandwich will help keep Dad healthy, while also keeping his taste buds more than satisfied. Nutritional Information per Serving: 597 calories, 41 g carbohydrates, 36 g protein, 33 g fat, 531 mg sodium, 6 g fiber.
Ingredients
  • 1 TBSP EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL
  • 1 LB. LEAN SKIRT STEAK, THINLY SLICED
  • 2 CLOVES GARLIC, MINCED
  • 1 SMALL YELLOW ONION, SLICED
  • 2 OZ PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS, SLICED
  • 1 GREEN BELL PEPPER, SLICED
  • 1 15-OZ CAN TOMATO SAUCE, NO SALT ADDED
  • GROUND BLACK PEPPER, AS DESIRED
  • ¼ TSP OREGANO
  • 4 OZ MOZZARELLA CHEESE, PART SKIM
  • 4 WHOLE GRAIN ROLLS (HOAGIE OR SUBMARINE), SPLIT
 
Instructions
  1. HEAT OLIVE OIL IN A LARGE SKILLET OR SAUTÉ PAN.
  2. PLACE SLICED STEAK INTO THE PAN AND SIMMER UNTIL TENDER, ABOUT 15 MINUTES.
  3. ADD GARLIC AND ONIONS, COOKING FOR 2 MINUTES.
  4. ADD MUSHROOMS AND PEPPERS AND SIMMER FOR AN ADDITIONAL 10 MINUTES.
  5. ADD TOMATO SAUCE, BLACK PEPPER AND OREGANO AND BRING TO SIMMER. COOK UNTIL VEGETABLES AND MEAT ARE VERY TENDER.
  6. ARRANGE MEAT, VEGETABLES AND SAUCE OVER SPLIT ROLL AND TOP WITH 1 OZ OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE.


We are the voice of the tomato products industry. We love all things healthy, nutritious, delicious, and tomato!

Follow Us on Social:

What this Dietitian Learned on a Cannery Tour

What this Dietitian Learned on a Cannery Tour

By Leslie Schilling, RD 

No foods were quite so delicious to me as a tomato sandwich on the beach with my family in the summertime, or my mom’s baked spaghetti loaded with tomato sauce and canned diced tomatoes. In full disclosure, I’ve always been a tomato lover. So, naturally, I was honored to be invited on a tour visiting family farms that produce around 95% of all the canned tomatoes in the United States. We also visited peach and pear farms and learned how many of these beautiful fruits are picked, transported, and canned, in a matter of hours. Let me tell you what I learned about cans, and about myself.

I had canned food amnesia (and I bet I’m not alone).

To be honest, I’d forgotten about canned produce. Between my formal education as a dietitian and a person who has the privilege to buy fresh produce, canned produce had all but disappeared from my grocery list and kitchen. Seeing the process of produce being picked fresh from the field, carefully prepared, and canned, reminded me that I’ve been missing out on the nutrition that canned foods can provide (and sadly, so were my clients). As a dietitian, my clients deserve recommendations that are both nutrient-rich and cost-effective. This tour helped me remember that cans can deliver quality nutrition and reduce the prep time needed to get busy families around a table together. Regardless of your household food budget, canned produce can play a role in every kitchen. 

Steel cans are recyclable – 100% recyclable

My mind was blown on this one. Did you know that a magnet can retrieve steel cans from a kitchen trash bag that ended up in a landfill? That can you never recycled? I didn’t either. Steel cans are retrieved from either landfills or recycling plants and remade into new cans. This makes steel cans a smart choice for families looking to add nutrition and care for the environment we live in. 

Nutrition sealed in time.

The canning process is one that has been around for more than a hundred years. While the technology involved in monitoring a cannery may look like a spaceship control center, the process remains simple, clean, and effective. As I watched tomatoes being placed into a rolling water bath, flash-steamed, and promptly sealed, it reminded of why my grandmother canned tomatoes right out of the garden. She’d say they’re fresh now, and they’ll be just as fresh when we open them in the winter. 

Not only is the freshness sealed in, the carotenoids that make tomatoes a nutritional powerhouse are amplified. Canned tomatoes are known for their cancer-fighting compound lycopene, which becomes 2.5 times more bioavailable after the canning process. The canning “process” (which is really just steaming or cooking), also brings out valuable nutrients in peaches. Canned peaches have higher levels of vitamin C and folate compared to the fresh fruit. 

Using canned foods can help reduce food waste. 

These days, commercially canned produce must include a best by date,  which is generally 36 months from the date of being sealed. When these canned foods are prepped, ready to open and add to a meal, we can also reduce food waste. Sadly, I’ve thrown away far too many fresh fruits and vegetables that I’ve forgotten or didn’t have time to prepare. Keeping canned produce in mind in our homes may help us add nutritional value and reduce food waste at the same time.

If you forget about the goodness of cans like I did, try to remember the acronym I created to prevent myself from ever experiencing canned food amnesia again. 

S – Sealed at the peak of freshness.

T – Takes less time and money.

I  – Can improve overall nutrition quality.

R – Can reduce food waste in fully recyclable packaging. 

Let’s help families STIR in cost-effective nutrition that’s as fresh as fresh can be. 

Big thanks to Pacific Coast Producers for hosting this amazing opportunity to see the harvest and canning process.

Leslie Schilling

Leslie Schilling

Nutrition Counseling for Families

Leslie Schilling owns a Las Vegas-based coaching practice, specializing in nutrition counseling for families, those of all ages with disordered eating concerns, and professional athletes and performers. In addition to running her practice, Leslie serves as a performance nutrition consultant for Cirque du Soleil® and an eating disorder specialist and supervisory consultant for eating disorder treatment centers in Nevada. With her warm, compassionate, and entertaining personality, Leslie been featured in media outlets like Women’s Health, Self, Pregnancy Magazine, The Yoga Journal, Bicycling, BuzzFeed, the Huffington Post, US News & World Report, and on HGTV. You may know her best as the creator of the Born To Eat® approach and co-author of the award-winning book, Born To Eat.


We are the voice of the tomato products industry. We love all things healthy, nutritious, delicious, and tomato!

Follow Us on Social:

Thin Crust Spinach Pizza (Ready in under 30 minutes)

Thin Crust Spinach Pizza (Ready in under 30 minutes)

By Caroline Kaufman, MS, RDN

Spinach is awesome! And as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, I want to celebrate everyday like it’s national spinach day. And spinach, tomato sauce and cheese? One of the best combos. I’ve cooked up a super quick and easy dinner recipe for spinach pizza that I’d love to share with you. I’m a fan of healthy convenience – that means cooking from scratch when you can, shopping for healthy packaged foods, and using time-savers to get dinner on the table pretty darn fast. My shortcuts here? Frozen chopped spinach, jarred pizza or marinara sauce, pre-crumbled feta, and whole-wheat flatbread. No need to rinse, sauté, boil, mince, crumble, mess up six pots and pans, or roll out dough that clearly has no interest in flattening out. If you’d like to sub the shortcuts for homemade dough or fresh spinach or some other ingredients, I know it’s going to taste awesome, I have no doubts. But these shortcuts are great for busy nights and dishwashing-haters like me.

Indulge me for a second while I opine about spinach. I load this pizza up with the stuff. Why? Well, 2 cups is 89% water, which means it’s naturally low-calorie and filling. For just 129 calories, you get 15 grams of protein and 14 grams of fiber, which helps you feel satisfied, and supports muscle growth and development and bowel regularity. To get the same amount of protein, you’d need to eat 6 slices of turkey and you wouldn’t get any fiber. Plus, those 2 cups of spinach are high in calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin E, and a good source of zinc and vitamin C. And bonus – the vitamin C in the pizza sauce will enhance iron absorption!

So here’s the recipe. Perfect for a busy night. Fun to make with kids. Great for singles. Or couples. Or parties.

Ingredients (for one pizza):

  • 1 whole wheat flatbread or lavash (I used Trader Joe’s whole wheat lavash bread)
  • 1/4 cup good pizza sauce or marinara sauce
  • 2 cups frozen, chopped spinach, cooked. Squeeze out excess water.
  • 3 artichoke hearts, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh buffalo mozzarella
  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

Instructions:

  • Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Line a baking sheet with tinfoil
  • Pre-crisp the flatbread by baking it for 2 minutes on each side (4 minutes total)
  • Spread the marinara on the toasted flatbread, leaving a 1-inch border of crust
  • Cover evenly with chopped spinach
  • Arrange the artichokes on the spinach
  • Add chopped mozzarella
  • Sprinkle feta cheese on top
  • Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the goat cheese is slightly brown and the mozzarella has melted.
Caroline Kaufman

Caroline Kaufman

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

 Caroline Kaufman MS, RDN is a Los Angeles-based Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, freelance writer, blogger and media spokesperson. Her advice has been featured in Health, EatingWell, Real Simple, Fox News, PBS Parents, upwave, and Food and Nutrition Magazine. Caroline loves to help busy people achieve their nutrition goals without adding stress; if you like the sound of that, check out her blog and follow her on TwitterPinterest,  Instagram and Facebook .


We are the voice of the tomato products industry. We love all things healthy, nutritious, delicious, and tomato!

Follow Us on Social:

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

By Amari Thomsen, RD

Think beyond coleslaw and sauerkraut and use cabbage in a more creative way!

These stuffed cabbage rolls feature delicious crunchy cabbage coated in a sweet red wine tomato sauce. Use these rolls as a tasty appetizers or a healthy lunch! Not only is this recipe low in calories and fat, it’s also packed full of cancer-fighting antioxidants. Tomatoes are rich in the antioxidant lycopene and cabbage is a great source of the antioxidant isothiocyanate. And did I mention all the vitamins and minerals packed into these little rolls? Enjoy a hefty dose of vitamin K and vitamin C with each bite!

To save time, you can assemble these rolls ahead of time, store them in the fridge, and bake them right before serving!

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Crushed Tomato Sauce
Serves 5 (2 rolls per serving)

Ingredients

Filling

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup brown rice, uncooked
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil, divided
  • 1 large head Savoy cabbage (3-4 lbs), stem removed
  • 8 oz baby bella mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 lb ground turkey breast
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp dried sage
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt, divided
  • 1/2 tsp ground pepper, divided
  • 1/2 cup red wine (I used Merlot)
  • 1/3 cup pine nuts, chopped

Sauce

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup red wine

Directions

Filling

  • In a medium-sized saucepan, combine water, rice and 1 Tbsp olive oil. Bring to a boil. Cover and let simmer on low for 35-40 minutes.
  • Fill a large pot half way with water. Bring water to a boil. Add head of cabbage and let boil for about 5 minutes. Prepare a baking sheet covered with paper towels. As the cabbage leaves soften, carefully remove them using tongs (you don’t want to tear them) and place them on the baking sheet. You need 10 large leaves total.
  • Remove remaining head of cabbage and drain. Set aside.
  • In a large skillet, combine 1 Tbsp olive oil, onion, and mushrooms and cook for about 10 minutes or until mushrooms have given up most of their liquid.
  • Add ground turkey and cook until browned and cooked through. Add garlic, sage, rosemary, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper and cook for a few minutes longer.
  • Add red wine and cook for another 5 minutes or until all of the wine has evaporated.
  • When rice is done, add meat mixture to rice pan.
  • In skillet, heat remaining 1 Tbsp olive oil. Thinly slice and chop the remaining cabbage (you’ll need 3 cups). Add it to the skillet along with remaining 1/4 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Cook for 5 minutes or until cabbage begins to brown. Add cabbage to the rice and meat mixture.

Sauce

  • Preheat oven to 375*F.
  • Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in empty skillet over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes or until onions are soft.
  • Add wine and crushed tomatoes. Bring mixture to a boil and then reduce heat to low. Let sauce simmer for 10 minutes until slightly thickened.

 finished-stuffed-cabage-rolls

Assembly

  • In a 9×13 inch pan, spoon a couple ladles of tomato sauce to coat the bottom of the pan.
  • On a clean work surface, using one cabbage leaf at a time, place 2-3 spoonfuls of the filling on top of the cabbage leave. Tightly roll the mixture up, folding in the sides of the leaves as you go like a burrito.
  • Place cabbage roll seam side down into the baking dish. Continue until all leaves and filling are used.
  • Spread about 1 cup of the tomato sauce over the rolls.
  • Bake uncovered at 375*F for 40 minutes basting the rolls every 15 minutes with additional sauce.

 

Amari Thomsen

Amari Thomsen

Registered Dietitian

Amari Thomsen is a Chicago Registered Dietitian and owner nutrition consulting private practice, Eat Chic Chicago. She graduated from Loyola University of Chicago with a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and later completed her nutrition education at the University of Illinois at Chicago with a Master’s degree in Nutrition Science. Through Eat Chic Chicago, Amari offers individual nutrition coaching for weight loss and specialty diet management, personalized grocery store tours, group seminars and healthy cooking demonstrations. Amari is also a freelance writer and nutrition blogger for local organizations and brands that support healthy living. She has previous experience working with Whole Foods Market, Naked Juice, KIND, and Lifetime Fitness. Learn more about Amari and Eat Chic Chicago at www.eatchicchicago.com.


We are the voice of the tomato products industry. We love all things healthy, nutritious, delicious, and tomato!

Follow Us on Social:

Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Chicken Enchiladas

Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Chicken Enchiladas

By Kylie of Imma Eat That

It’s always a good time for enchiladas.  Is it weird to wrap up enchiladas with little, baby cabbages inside?  I say no.  This is mainly because lately I’ve been living in a Brussels sprouts obsessed phase.  And also because it’s always a good time for enchiladas, whether they’re filled with little green Brussels sprouts or not.  No judgment here.  I accept all the enchiladas.

enchilada-1

There’s this thing about crispy oven-roasted Brussels sprouts that just does it for me.  Actually oven-roasted veggies in general just do it for me.  Oven-roasted carrots with a pinch of sea salt + honey.  Oven-roasted tomatoes topped with Parmesan + basil.  Umm yeah.

Tomatoes just have this magical way of getting all caramelized and sweet when roasted.  A can of roasted tomatoes can do wonders to a plain ol’ pizza crust.  Really, tomato anything can do wonders for a dish.  Not to mention the powerhouse nutrient lycopene, which tomatoes are bursting with.

enchilada-2

I buy a lot of tomato paste.  It’s one of those pantry staples just necessary for life.  So many recipes call for a delicious addition of tomato-y goodness.  Enchilada sauce, pasta sauce, pizza sauce, soups, stews…they all NEED it.  This article on how to save leftover tomato paste has spared quite a few half empty cans of the stuff.

So for this recipe I filled enchiladas with mashed acorn squash, which makes them oh-so-creamy without being super heavy and cheesy.  A little of extra sharp cheddar on top adds plenty of cheesy goodness.  Pair that with the sweet enchiladas sauce and you’ve got yourself a perfect dinner.

enchilada-3

Roasted Brussels Sprout & Chicken Enchiladas Serves 4-6

 Ingredients:

Enchilada Filling

2 chicken breasts, cooked & shredded

1 small acorn squash, sliced in half and seeds scooped out

2 cups fresh Brussels sprouts (~18 balls), quartered

½ teaspoon chili powder

¼ teaspoon cumin

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

12-14 (6-inch) corn tortillas

½ cup extra sharp white cheddar, grated

Enchilada Sauce

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon + 2 teaspoon chili powder

2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

6-ounce can tomato paste

1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions:

1. Preheat oven to 375F.

2. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and place acorn squash cut side down.  Bake for 40 minutes, or until soft.

3. While baking, toss the quartered Brussels sprouts with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Spread onto a separate baking sheet and place in the oven.  Bake for 30 minutes, stirring twice throughout cooking.

4. While baking, make your enchilada sauce.  Heat olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat.  Add in garlic and stir until garlic turns golden brown, about 1 minute.  Add in chili powder and stir for 1 minute.  Add in chicken broth, tomato paste and salt.  Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cover.

5. Scoop flesh out of the acorn squash into a large bowl.  Add in shredded chicken, roasted Brussels sprouts, chili powder, cumin, salt and pepper.

6. Now assemble your enchiladas.  Wrap your tortillas in a damp paper towel and heat for 30 seconds in the microwave to make them pliable.  Scoop ¼ cup enchilada sauce into the bottom of a casserole dish (I had to use 2 baking dishes).

7. Lightly coat a tortilla with enchilada sauce, add some filling and roll up the enchilada.  Repeat until tortillas and filling are all rolled up.  Pour remaining enchilada sauce over the top of the enchiladas.  Sprinkle with cheese.

8. Bake at 375F for 35-40 minutes.  Just before serving, place under the oven broiler for 30 seconds to get the cheese all crispy.

 

Kylie

Kylie

Food Blogger

Kylie is a food blogger and dietetic intern living in Houston, TX.  Her recipes try to make healthy eating something to look forward to.  While healthy eating is important, Kylie is a huge fan of everything in moderation…including moderation.  You can connect with Kylie on instagramtwitterfacebookbloglovin or pinterest.


We are the voice of the tomato products industry. We love all things healthy, nutritious, delicious, and tomato!

Follow Us on Social: