Pasta with Marinara and Roasted Vegetables

Pasta with Marinara and Roasted Vegetables

 

Turn to marinara sauce and a cornucopia of vegetables—summer squash, eggplant, bell peppers, and onions—to make this Pasta with Marinara and Roasted Vegetables sing with rustic simplicity.

Key ingredients for this pasta dish.
Arrange vegetables on a baking sheet, sprinkle with olive oil and seasonings, and then roast.

Yield: 4

Pasta with Marinara and Roasted Vegetables

Pasta with Marinara and Roasted Vegetables
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 assorted small summer squash (i.e., scallop, yellow, zucchini), sliced
  • 1 small eggplant, sliced
  • ½ red onion, sliced
  • 1 bell pepper (red, yellow, or green), sliced
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 2 teaspoons ground oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Sea salt to taste (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 12 ounces fresh pasta (may substitute dried pasta)
  • 2 cups marinara sauce
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
  2. Arrange summer squash, eggplant, onions, and bell pepper on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and vinegar. Sprinkle with garlic, oregano, black pepper and sea salt. Toss together on pan to distribute ingredients.
  3. Place on top rack of oven and roast for about 30 minutes, until golden brown and tender. When done, remove from oven and set aside.
  4. To toast pine nuts, place them in a small baking dish in the hot oven for about 5 minutes while vegetables are roasting. Remove and set aside.
  5. Meanwhile, bring water to boil in a medium pot. Add pasta and cook to al dente stage (according to package directions). Place in colander and rinse and drain.
  6. Add marinara sauce to pot and heat until bubbling. Remove from heat and add cooked pasta, stirring gently to distribute ingredients.
  7. Divide pasta with marinara sauce among 4 pasta bowls (or plates). Top with roasted vegetables, pinenuts, and fresh basil.

Nutrition Information:

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 369Total Fat: 14.5gSaturated Fat: 2gSodium: 116mgCarbohydrates: 54gFiber: 10gSugar: 18gProtein: 10g

 

 
Tackling Top 5 Myths About Tomato Products

Tackling Top 5 Myths About Tomato Products

How can something as delicious and healthy as tomatoes be so maligned by so many people? That’s why we’re tackling the top 5 myths about tomato products!

There’s a lot of health and nutrition advice out there on these interwebs. Too much really. One article contradicting the next. It’s long been documented (often) that these ‘influencers’ are usually wrong, but they continue to be widely listened to and shared on the internet. These celebrities, influencers or sports stars that may have wonderful six-pack abs, but in no way should they be considered nutrition experts. We have always prided ourselves in going to the experts for nutrition. We have over 700 academic, peer-reviewed scientific studies hosted on our website, and we work with the World’s top Registered Dietitians to break down the science and nutrition facts about tomato products. To be a registered dietitian you must get a degree from a university in nutrition, often it includes advanced degrees or Masters, and then 1200 internship hours, as well as taking continuing education courses on the latest science and nutrition. These are the experts we go to for our nutrition advice and this is what they have to say about some of the myths right now you may see shared on Facebook from your favorite quarterback, actress, or your Aunt’s neighbor’s sister’s cousin on social media.

Canned tomato products have been around since the canning process was first invented in 1809. Since then, millions of people have relied upon canned tomatoes to capture the essence of delicious, healthy tomatoes when they are at their absolute best during the harvest, so they can flavor their meals with delicious nutrition all year long. So, how can something as delicious and healthy as tomatoes be so maligned by so many people? Tomatoes are constantly being trashed by the media and so-called “health experts”, so we are here to set the record straight on the health benefits of tomatoes!

Busting 5 Myths About Canned Tomatoes

Here are the top five myths on canned tomatoes, and we’re busting each and every one of them.

Myth # 1: Tomatoes Contain Harmful BPA

BPA is an industrial chemical used to make certain plastics and resins, including plastic bottles, and the lining of food cans. Over the past several years, health concerns have arisen over BPA in our food system, as it has been linked with potential issues, such as endocrine disorders. However, the FDA says that our current levels of BPA are within safe limits. And, more importantly, the canned tomato industry has worked hard to remove BPA from the food chain, and it has been virtually eliminated in cans. Bottomline: There’s no need to worry about BPA in canned tomatoes. Read more about BPA in canned tomato products here.

Myth #2: Tomatoes Contain Dangerous Lectins

Lectins are anti-nutrients found in many healthy plant-based foods. Lots of so-called health gurus are warning people to stay away from plant foods we know are healthful—whole grains, beans, even vegetables—because of these so-called harmful compounds. The main reason they can be detrimental is that they can block absorption of other nutrients in foods. In fact, fiber was once considered an anti-nutrient, as it can block some of the nutrients from being absorbed in foods. Now scientists are finding that some of these compounds in the family of anti-nutrients may actually have benefits, like reducing glucose and cholesterol levels. In addition, cooking foods—as in canned tomatoes—helps reduce levels of anti-nutrients in foods. Keep in mind that over 650 human studies on tomato products finds nothing but benefits—not risks—from eating these healthy foods. Bottomline: There’s no need to worry about health risks of lectins in tomato products.

Myths #3: Tomatoes Are Inflammatory

Some would-be health experts warn that eating tomatoes promotes inflammation, which is at the root of many chronic diseases. However, the science doesn’t agree. Numerous studies have found that tomatoes actually decrease levels of inflammation, which means they can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer. So, pile on the tomatoes to reduce inflammation. Bottomline: Tomato products decrease inflammatory levels in the body, not increase them.

Myth #4: Canned Tomato Products Are Highly Processed and Contain Preservatives and Unhealthy Ingredients

The canning process means that tomatoes do not need additional preservatives. Because they have been cooked and sealed in the can, they will not spoil. Indeed, canned tomatoes are simply tomatoes, picked at their peak maturity, before they are canned with water and perhaps some salt (though you can buy unsalted varieties, too). Canned tomato products are considered minimally processed foods, in comparison to highly processed foods, like soda, chips, and candy. Some canned tomato products—such as salsa and marinara sauce may contain other ingredients and flavorings, so check out the ingredients label to see what is listed. Bottomline: Canned tomato products are minimally processed, healthful foods with few added ingredients.

Myth #5 Canned Tomato Products Don’t Count as Real Vegetables

Every can of tomato products contains real, farm-fresh tomatoes, harvested at its ripe maturity, before it gets placed in a can in just a few hours—sealing in all of that goodness. The USDA, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and Produce for Better Health Foundation all recognize canned tomatoes (as well as other canned produce) as a form of vegetables that counts as a serving of healthy, disease-protective vegetables that we all should get more of in our diets. In fact, only 9% of Americans get enough vegetables in their diets, so it’s important to fit in more servings like canned tomatoes. Eating more vegetables can decrease your risk of many chronic diseases and obesity. In addition, cooking tomatoes—as they are in canned tomatoes—actually makes the antioxidant compound lycopene even more available to your body, making them a superior source of this nutrient. Bottomline: Canned tomatoes are an easy, affordable way to fit more health-protective vegetables into your diet.

If you see these myths spread online, share with them this post. Start following registered Dietitians online! Their advice isn’t nearly as sexy or sensational, but they know what is really best for your body in the long run. When people stop listening to influencers and their pseudoscience fad diets we’ll all be a lot more happy and healthy.

Contributions by Sharon Palmer, MSFS, RDN, The Plant-Powered Dietitian, SharonPalmer.com.

Canned, cooked tomatoes can reduce the risk of prostate cancer

Canned, cooked tomatoes can reduce the risk of prostate cancer

Cooked tomatoes may reduce the risk of prostate cancer according to a recent study conducted by researchers at Loma Linda University Health.

Tomato Consumption and Intake of Lycopene as Predictors of the Incidence of Prostate Cancer: The Adventist Health Study-2, published in Cancer Causes and Control on Feb. 25, found that men who consumed canned and cooked tomatoes 5 to 6 times per week had a 28% decreased risk of prostate cancer compared with men who never consumed this food.

First author of the paper, Gary Fraser, MBChB, PhD, said the effect was still significant even after adjusting for a number of potential confounders, including ethnicity, education, obesity, exercise levels, alcohol consumption and others.

“Interestingly, the decreased risk was only seen in those men who ate canned and cooked tomatoes,” Fraser said.

To examine how tomato consumption might impact the development of prostate cancer, the researchers looked for significant relationships between diet and prostate cancer in nearly 28,000 Adventist men in the U.S.

All Adventist Health Study participants agree to fill out self-administered food frequency questionnaires reporting their average number of times per week they ate of approximately 200 foods and beverages and serving sizes. After tracking the study’s male participants — all of whom were cancer-free when they enrolled in the project — for nearly eight years, 1,226 of them had been diagnosed with prostate cancer, 355 of those as aggressive cases.

While all tomatoes and tomato-based products contain lycopene, other studies have shown that lycopene is absorbed at different rates depending on the product consumed. Lycopene bioavailability is higher when tomatoes have been heated or cooked, and especially if cooked with oil. Processing tomatoes in this way contributes to the separation of the lycopene from the carrier proteins.

This research suggests that it is particularly cooked tomatoes that may play a significant role in reducing a man’s risk for developing prostate cancer. It may be their lycopene content that is the active principle.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide. In the United States alone, there were an estimated 165,000 new cases of prostate cancer and nearly 30,000 deaths just in 2018. Since 1989, a research team at Loma Linda University Health has examined a number of dietary practices to see which offer promise in preventing chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Earlier research in the Adventist Health Study and several other projects internationally suggest high lycopene intake is associated with reduced risk of prostate cancer. Tomato and tomato-based products are of particular interest since they are major sources of the carotenoid lycopene.

Fraser, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Loma Linda University, said researchers will continue to look at various tomato products and their potential to reduce prostate cancer risk. “Still,” he added, “men concerned about developing prostate cancer could consider adding cooked and canned tomatoes to their diet on a regular basis.”

Original article from Loma Linda University

Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes

Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes

Looking for an easy, classic potato side-dish you can throw together in minutes? Well, here you go! This simple, flavorful 4-ingredient side dish for Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes can be whipped up easy-peasy, out of ingredients you probably have in your pantry right now. The beauty of this vegetable and potato dish is that it calls upon three favorites—canned tomatoes, rosemary and potatoes. This 100% plant-based side-dish is the perfect accompaniment for savory dishes, such as lentil pattieschickpea loaf, and veggie balls. Plus it’s a great dish to tote along to your next potluck or even holiday dinner. Best of all, it’s an easy way to fit in a serving of healthful vegetables into your day!

The classic Mediterranean flavors of rosemary, garlic, olive oil, and tomatoes are all alive and present in this satisfying dish. If you don’t have fresh rosemary available (which is one of the easiest herbs to grow in warm weather climates), used dried rosemary.

Spread tomatoes on top of potatoes and bake.

Yield: 6 servings

Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes

Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes

This simple, flavorful 4-ingredient side dish for Roasted Rosemary Potatoes and Tomatoes can be whipped up easy-peasy, out of ingredients you probably have in your pantry right now.

Ingredients

  • 6 medium red and/or gold potatoes, unpeeled, scrubbed
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Black pepper and salt, as desired (optional)
  • 1 ½ teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary (or 1 teaspoon dried)

Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
    2. Slice unpeeled potatoes into thin wedges and place in a 9 × 13 inch baking dish.
    3. Spoon over garlic, canned diced tomatoes, olive oil, black pepper and salt (as desired), and rosemary. Toss to distribute ingredients using tongs or a spoon.
    4. Bake uncovered for about 1 hour, until tender and golden brown. Stir ingredients every 20 minutes.

 

Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake

Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake

This easy casserole bake can be whipped together in minutes! Plus, this completely plant-based (vegan) Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake is based on foods you can keep on hand in your pantry: spelt (an ancient form of wheat kernels), canned chickpeas, canned marinated artichokes, marinara sauce, and olives. It’s savory, hearty and a one-dish meal. And with only 8 ingredients (not including pantry staples), this healthy, no-oil, no-salt, no-sugar whole foods, plant-based recipe is a cinch to turn to on your busiest nights of the weeks.

With the Mediterranean flavors of chickpeas, ancient grains, artichokes, olives, tomatoes, and herbs, this recipe is powerful in flavor, and packed with important nutrients, such as plant protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. Whip it up for a one-dish meal, and pack up the leftovers for work the next day. You can swap out the ingredients easily, too—try quinoa instead of spelt (which makes this recipe gluten-free), white beans instead of chickpeas, and green beans instead of peas, for example.

 
Yield: 6 servings

Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake

Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake

This completely plant-based (vegan) Easy Mediterranean Artichoke Chickpea Bake is based on foods you can keep on hand in your pantry.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups cooked spelt (according to package directions)
  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas (garbanzos), drained
  • 1 12-ounce jar marinated artichokes, drained
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • ½ cup olives, drained (i.e. Spanish, Kalamata)
  • ½ cup marinara sauce
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Pinch black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon oregano

Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
    2. Mix all ingredients together and place in a medium casserole dish.
    3. Place in oven, on top rack, uncovered, and bake for about 30 – 35 minutes, until golden brown and heated through.

Notes

To make this recipe gluten-free, substitute a gluten-free grain (quinoa, sorghum, brown rice) for spelt.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6 servings

Serving Size:

1 serving

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 268Total Fat: 6gSaturated Fat: 0gSodium: 312mgCarbohydrates: 50gFiber: 14gSugar: 9gProtein: 12g