Diabetes Mellitus

Thirty-four (34) publications meeting criteria for this review were available. Data suggest a neutral relationship between dietary lycopene and risk for diabetes mellitus based on incidence of disease and risk factors, such as HgA1c, glucose, insulin. Plasma/serum lycopene concentrations and diabetes risk are mixed with both protective and neutral relationships reported in nearly equal ratio. Data are limited for lycopene supplementation (n=2 studies), but may suggest a beneficial effect for risk factor management in people with diabetes. Lycopene supplementation decreased oxidative stress and improved lipid status in people with diabetes. Similar findings were shown in studies feeding tomato/tomato products, including 1 study reporting improvements in HgA1c. Observational data on tomato intake are mixed with neutral, negative and positive relationships with diabetes/risk factors reported. Processed tomato products appear to be a favorable choice for potential benefits; although this observation is limited and requires additional research for clarity. Findings are based on effects of tomato/tomato products on glycation variables, lipids, oxidative stress and insulin.

Main Findings

Main Findings

Main Findings

Main Findings

Dietary Lycopene and
Disease Risk

This section critically evaluates the relationship between dietary lycopene intake and bone health as measured by:

Plasma/Serum Lycopene
and Disease Risk

This section critically evaluates the relationship between plasma/ serum lycopene concentrations and bone health as measured by:

Lycopene Supplementation
and Disease Risk

This section critically evaluates the relationship between lycopene supplementation and bone health as measured by:

Tomato/Tomato-based foods and Disease Risk

This section critically evaluates the relationship between lycopene supplementation and bone health as measured by:

Critical Findings

Critical Findings

Critical Findings

Critical Findings